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  • let's post some more 5 Cent patterns. My type set of 1866 Washington 5 Cent Patterns.
    let's post some more 5 Cent patterns. My type set of 1866 Washington 5 Cent Patterns.
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  • I have the itching to post another composite pattern set I just completed. The nice draw of patterns for me is the many subsets one can focus on to collect. Nice little goals to keep my interest. The photo below represent a set of Goloid Dollars struck in copper. Of the 11 die parings of goloid's dollars struck in 1878, 1879 and 1880, 10 of these parings were struck in copper (besides the Goloid and Aluminum examples). Earlier this year I picked up my last piece that filled in my 10 piece type set. I love the look of the Morgan's coiled hair and the Bun hair liberty design along with the history for these patterns.
    I have the itching to post another composite pattern set I just completed. The nice draw of patterns for me is the many subsets one can focus on to collect. Nice little goals to keep my interest. The photo below represent a set of Goloid Dollars struck in copper. Of the 11 die parings of goloid's dollars struck in 1878, 1879 and 1880, 10 of these parings were struck in copper (besides the Goloid and Aluminum examples). Earlier this year I picked up my last piece that filled in my 10 piece type set. I love the look of the Morgan's coiled hair and the Bun hair liberty design along with the history for these patterns.
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  • Seems to me that us pattern collectors do not chatter very much, which is not a bad thing, however I am going to boast a little here.

    I Just received my 5C Pattern J-634 from the last Simpson FUN Auction conducted by Heritage.

    I make note of this as it is the 2nd to last piece I needed to complete a series of Small Denomination pattern sets of 1868/1869 that I had been assembling. I have been able to collect samples of both Nickel and copper to showcase the attempt of the mint standardize small denominations (1C, 3C and 5C) in 1868/69. Now - if I only won the 3CN in copper J619 that Dr. Bones won in the Simpson sale a couple of years ago, my story would be complete
    Seems to me that us pattern collectors do not chatter very much, which is not a bad thing, however I am going to boast a little here. I Just received my 5C Pattern J-634 from the last Simpson FUN Auction conducted by Heritage. I make note of this as it is the 2nd to last piece I needed to complete a series of Small Denomination pattern sets of 1868/1869 that I had been assembling. I have been able to collect samples of both Nickel and copper to showcase the attempt of the mint standardize small denominations (1C, 3C and 5C) in 1868/69. Now - if I only won the 3CN in copper J619 that Dr. Bones won in the Simpson sale a couple of years ago, my story would be complete 😊
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  • A few of the pieces form The Estate of Charles W. Montgomery rolled into the recent December Heritage auction and I did pick up another of the collection, a J653 … a 1$ Gold pattern stuck in Aluminum. Not a high-end piece but fairly rare. Saul with Uspatterns.com identified 6 examples so far which would make this Judd a High R7 vs the low R7 noted in the Judd reference book. https://uspatterns.store.turbify.net/j653p726.html While most of the 1868 Aluminum sets have now been broken up, Bill Rue’s pattern sale database recorded the 1st 1868 Aluminum set being auctioned in Ebenezer Mason’s Oct 1870 sale, however there was a single 1$ pieced also auction at the time. I am not sure what to make of the apparent die rust on the reverse which might imply this was a later restrike or just a aluminum planchet issue as minted or from over time?
    A few of the pieces form The Estate of Charles W. Montgomery rolled into the recent December Heritage auction and I did pick up another of the collection, a J653 … a 1$ Gold pattern stuck in Aluminum. Not a high-end piece but fairly rare. Saul with Uspatterns.com identified 6 examples so far which would make this Judd a High R7 vs the low R7 noted in the Judd reference book. https://uspatterns.store.turbify.net/j653p726.html While most of the 1868 Aluminum sets have now been broken up, Bill Rue’s pattern sale database recorded the 1st 1868 Aluminum set being auctioned in Ebenezer Mason’s Oct 1870 sale, however there was a single 1$ pieced also auction at the time. I am not sure what to make of the apparent die rust on the reverse which might imply this was a later restrike or just a aluminum planchet issue as minted or from over time?
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  • I noted USpatterns.com just added a consolidated price list of patterns from Heritage’s Nov 16/17 Dallas auction.
    https://uspatterns.com/heno20sa2.html https://uspatterns.com/heno20sa2.html auction.

    A majority were from the Charles Montgomery estate and exhibited a nice collection of off-metal gold patterns. I was able to win a couple of the patterns that I had my eye on in prior auctions of Bass and Simpson and please I was able to win them at the level I was willing to bid. I presume most of patterns may have been assembled about 20 + years ago as several had the Bass (1999) pedigree as well as Pittman and not appeared in auctions since 2000 or so.
    I made the comment a few months back that I completed a 6 piece set of “GOD OUR TRUST“ Eagle patterns in copper that took years to assemble and then Heritage started to load this set up onto their site. Montgomery’s collection had many of these samples that included duplicate in Gilt.
    Over-all,I thought the collection was a nice balance of grade and scarcity that the price levels appeared reasonable. Some pieces, I thought, were even cheap when comparing to other auctions.

    I wonder what other pattern collectors thought?
    I noted USpatterns.com just added a consolidated price list of patterns from Heritage’s Nov 16/17 Dallas auction. https://uspatterns.com/heno20sa2.html https://uspatterns.com/heno20sa2.html auction. A majority were from the Charles Montgomery estate and exhibited a nice collection of off-metal gold patterns. I was able to win a couple of the patterns that I had my eye on in prior auctions of Bass and Simpson and please I was able to win them at the level I was willing to bid. I presume most of patterns may have been assembled about 20 + years ago as several had the Bass (1999) pedigree as well as Pittman and not appeared in auctions since 2000 or so. I made the comment a few months back that I completed a 6 piece set of “GOD OUR TRUST“ Eagle patterns in copper that took years to assemble and then Heritage started to load this set up onto their site. Montgomery’s collection had many of these samples that included duplicate in Gilt. Over-all,I thought the collection was a nice balance of grade and scarcity that the price levels appeared reasonable. Some pieces, I thought, were even cheap when comparing to other auctions. I wonder what other pattern collectors thought?
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  • I enjoy assembling various pattern type sets that display the various obverse / reverse motifs. I am happy that I just completed another one … a 4 piece Indian Princess 10 Cent sample set. I assemble these independent of the material they were struck in and edge types – mainly because I do not have enough life span to narrow these down.
    My set is shown below and the piece I just added was a J-1077. This piece had been cleaned (I guess we like to say restored) in the few last years. It turns out this piece is a match to the Willaim Rau / Harry Bass (1999) piece as a PCGS64. In my eyes, it is 10 times improvement in eye appeal now. The Piece since In Rua hands (NGC65) has been regraded twice (once back to PCGS64 and now NGC64 6680463-005 ).
    I enjoy assembling various pattern type sets that display the various obverse / reverse motifs. I am happy that I just completed another one … a 4 piece Indian Princess 10 Cent sample set. I assemble these independent of the material they were struck in and edge types – mainly because I do not have enough life span to narrow these down. My set is shown below and the piece I just added was a J-1077. This piece had been cleaned (I guess we like to say restored) in the few last years. It turns out this piece is a match to the Willaim Rau / Harry Bass (1999) piece as a PCGS64. In my eyes, it is 10 times improvement in eye appeal now. The Piece since In Rua hands (NGC65) has been regraded twice (once back to PCGS64 and now NGC64 6680463-005 ).
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  • Does anyone have any knowledge if either an updated Judd or Pollock type reference is being worked on or maybe just a completely new reference on patterns will be published? I had recall reading a post a couple of years back about an update was being worked? Not sure if Roger was working to publish more works on patterns?
    Does anyone have any knowledge if either an updated Judd or Pollock type reference is being worked on or maybe just a completely new reference on patterns will be published? I had recall reading a post a couple of years back about an update was being worked? Not sure if Roger was working to publish more works on patterns?
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  • It would be nice if one could use MARK Downs when adding their comments (like bold facing, indenting, paragraphs etc), especially when one add owners comments to their inventory pieces, As of now, all text just ends up a in long line.
    It would be nice if one could use MARK Downs when adding their comments (like bold facing, indenting, paragraphs etc), especially when one add owners comments to their inventory pieces, As of now, all text just ends up a in long line.
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  • I like dedicated specialty groups in MYCOLLECTIONS ... thanks for setting this one up.
    I though I share a photo layout of my sampling of pattern shield nickels - I like to call this my type set. I do not think I will seek any other samples but one never knows
    I like dedicated specialty groups in MYCOLLECTIONS ... thanks for setting this one up. I though I share a photo layout of my sampling of pattern shield nickels - I like to call this my type set. I do not think I will seek any other samples but one never knows
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  • I've just acquired this invalid coin mention. From The Bob Simpson Collection Pt 2, Heritage Nov 2020 Auction /Lot 3096,

    I tracked image to several priors ...
    Heritage June 2005 Long Beach (From The Western Hill Collection) / Lot #7353 (as NGC65RB);
    David Akers Oct 1997 The John Jay Pittman Collection: Part 1 / Lot # 770 ($3080) with Note Prior Purchased by John Pittman for 55$ as Lot 5 from Abe Kosoff’s 1958 ANA Convention sale
    _________________________________________________
    Characteristics:
    Noted priors that several blatant engraving errors clearly show, including an E originally cut in place of the Ain STATES, and the 6 first erroneously punched in the 3’s position. Sharply struck with a high wire rim. There are some light hairlines in the fields as well as several spots.

    A die break runs in three directions from the eagle's right wing: 1) through the left side of the A to the rim; 2) down through the cloud and the stop between the date and AMERICA to the rim; and 3) from the top of the eagle's wing into the field, past the eagle's beak toward the E in STATES. Struck with dies parallel to each other, i.e. rotated 180 degrees from the normal “coin turn” of U.S. coinage.

    These characteristics indicate that this is a Restrike minted maybe 20 years after 1836. This is a R.6 with an estimated 20-25 examples known
    I've just acquired this [coin:79e1cda7-2ef0-11ee-bdc5-060e37a4c43f]. From The Bob Simpson Collection Pt 2, Heritage Nov 2020 Auction /Lot 3096, I tracked image to several priors ... Heritage June 2005 Long Beach (From The Western Hill Collection) / Lot #7353 (as NGC65RB); David Akers Oct 1997 The John Jay Pittman Collection: Part 1 / Lot # 770 ($3080) with Note Prior Purchased by John Pittman for 55$ as Lot 5 from Abe Kosoff’s 1958 ANA Convention sale _________________________________________________ Characteristics: Noted priors that several blatant engraving errors clearly show, including an E originally cut in place of the Ain STATES, and the 6 first erroneously punched in the 3’s position. Sharply struck with a high wire rim. There are some light hairlines in the fields as well as several spots. A die break runs in three directions from the eagle's right wing: 1) through the left side of the A to the rim; 2) down through the cloud and the stop between the date and AMERICA to the rim; and 3) from the top of the eagle's wing into the field, past the eagle's beak toward the E in STATES. Struck with dies parallel to each other, i.e. rotated 180 degrees from the normal “coin turn” of U.S. coinage. These characteristics indicate that this is a Restrike minted maybe 20 years after 1836. This is a R.6 with an estimated 20-25 examples known
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